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There is no doubt that the past year has been tough and that COVID-19 is a reason for caution – but it’s also a big reason to keep our health as our #1 priority – and that includes our oral health.

Why do regular dental visits matter?

Regular dental visits are important and can help spot dental health problems early on when treatment is likely to be easier and more affordable. Regular visits also help prevent many problems from developing in the first place, as some diseases have symptoms that can appear in the mouth.

I’m not having any symptoms – should I still see my dentist?

Yes! Taking care of your dental health on a consistent schedule is an essential part of your overall health. Keep your dentist informed of any changes in your health since medications can affect your dental health as well.

How Often Do I need to see the dentist?

There is no one-size-fits-all dental treatment. Some people need to visit the dentist once or twice a year; others may need more visits. You are a unique individual, with a unique smile and unique needs when it comes to keeping your smile healthy.

What Are Some Signs to See My Dentist?

The following are signs that you need to see your Dentist:

  • Your teeth are sensitive to hot or cold
  • Your gums are puffy and/or they bleed when you brush or floss
  • You have fillings, crowns, dental implants, dentures, etc.
  • You don’t like the way your smile or teeth look
  • You have persistent bad breath or bad taste in your mouth
  • You are pregnant
  • You have pain or swelling in your mouth, face or neck
  • You have difficulty chewing or swallowing
  • You have a family history of gum disease or tooth decay
  • You have a medical condition such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, eating disorders or are HIV positive
  • Your mouth is often dry
  • You smoke or use other tobacco products
  • You are undergoing medical treatment such as radiation,
    chemotherapy or hormone replacement therapy
  • Your jaw sometimes pops or is painful when opening and closing, chewing or when you first wake up; you have an uneven bite
  • You have a spot or sore that doesn’t look or feel right in your mouth and it isn’t going away

Your dental health is related to your overall health

Some studies show that people with gum disease are more likely have heart disease than those with healthy gums. Researchers aren’t sure why that is; gum disease isn’t proven to cause other diseases. But it makes sense to take care of your mouth like you do the rest of your body.

Gum Disease and Diabetes

Diabetes can reduce the body’s resistance to infection. Elevated blood sugars increase the risk of developing gum disease. What’s more, gum disease can make it harder to keep blood sugar levels in check. Protect your gums by keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Brush after each meal and floss and rinse with an antiseptic mouthwash daily. See your dentist at least twice a year. Sometimes you dentists may want to see you more often.

Stress and Teeth Grinding

If you are stressed, anxious, or depressed, you may be at higher risk for oral health problems. People under stress produce high levels of the hormone cortisol, which wreaks havoc on the gums and body. Stress also leads to poor oral care; more than 50% of people don’t brush or floss regularly when stressed. Other stress-related habits include smoking, drinking alcohol, and clenching and grinding teeth (called bruxism).

There are several other implications for dental health that affects your overall wellness so during this pandemic (and always) it’s imperative to keep on top of things and stay as healthy as possible.

Infection control has always been a top priority for our practice and you may have seen this during your visits to our office.

Our infection control processes are made so that when you receive care, it’s both safe and comfortable. We want to tell you about the infection control procedures we follow in our practice to keep patients and staff safe. Our office follows infection control recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). We follow the activities of these agencies so that we are up-to-date on any new rulings or guidance that may be issued. We do this to make sure that our infection control procedures are current and adhere to each agencies’ recommendations. The bottom line is that we are doing everything we can to keep you and our staff safe.

Please visit our website at www.broomfielddentist.com or give us a call at 303-460-9366 to schedule an appointment or ask us questions about your dental care.